2013-10-10 14.54.10

Undergraduate Studies

IMG_4516 (Medium)FOR 2505    Soils for Plant Growth
Students examine relationships between soils and plants, and related roles of water and nutrients. Factors that restrict root growth, and processes that influence soil development are revealed through field exercises and laboratory work. Effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on forest soils and subsequent plant responses are emphasized.

FOR 3456    Forest Watershed and Forest Fire Management
Emphasizes the principles of management of watersheds and fire at the stand and landscape level. Influences of climate, topography/terrain, and stand and fuel types are covered. Concepts of watershed conservation are introduced as well as principles and models dealing with water retention and flow, and carbon and nutrient cycling in primary forest watersheds. Fire management concepts deal with the Fire Weather Index system, the Fire Behaviour Prediction system, fire ecology, and fire management strategies, tactics and operations.

FOR 3457   Forest Watershed and Water Quality Management
2015-03-11 15.00.34Emphasizes the principles of management of watersheds and fire at the stand and landscape level. Influences of climate, topography/terrain, and stand and fuel types are covered. Concepts of watershed conservation are introduced as well as principles and models dealing with water retention and flow, and carbon and nutrient cycling in primary forest watersheds. The course provides lectures and laboratory exercises dealing with chemical, biochemical, and biological water quality enhancement and pollution issues.

FOR 4973   Forest Field Camp
An intensive 6-day series of field exercises, starting before the Fall Term, involving low student/faculty ratios, and designed to improve integrative and quantitative-forecasting skills. Evening sessions provide overviews of the scope of forest-ecosystem management generally, and in relation to the specific field-camp situation.

Associated with the undergraduate GIS Course

 

Past Graduates

BScF

Kayla Noble. 2012. Hydrological risk in Costa Maya Mexico.